Monday, April 22, 2019

The bodaboda accidents killed 8,000 people for 10 years


A total of 8,004 people have died from motorcycle accidents while 35,231 were injured in the last 10 years, the Police Force Road Traffic Army has explained.

These figures are reported when there is an increase in the number of motorcycles coming into the country because of 2.1 million registered vehicles in 2018, 1.3 million is a motorcycle.

Releasing these statistics recently, Police Commander, SACP, Fortunatus Muslimu said the number was based on records that were taken by the army from 2009 to 2018.

He said the statistics show the serious consequences of bodaboda accidents that have caused many people to die, injuries and remain disabled.

“The total accident for the 10 years caused by motorcycles reached 37,421 which resulted in 35,231 injuries and 8,004 deaths,” said Muslimu.

He said the reduction of accidents from 2016 to 2018, caused by ‘ata na na

“Over the past three years, traffic accidents have decreased substantially, the bills involving bodaboda have decreased from 2,128 in 2016 to 694 in 2018,” he said.

He said that the statistics indicate the continued decline in accidents, deaths and injuries, but people who died and injured without notice due to bodaboda accidents were still large.

Assistant Assistant and Attorney General, Deus Sokoni said bodaboda crashes have been even fatal to many pedestrians who have been injured and died.

“In January to March this year, 467 pedestrians have died after being hit by bodaboda,” he said.

In addition, bodaboda accidents have been costing the Government in treatment.  Statistics show that among the 22,836 casualties who had undergone an emergency unit at the bone and nerve unit of the Muhimbili (MOI) in 2015-2018, 70 percent were bodaboda injuries.

Specialist surgeon and epidemic MOI, Kennedy Nchimbi said the number of casualties in 2015/16 was 7,884 and in 2016/17 decreased to 6,669 and in 2017/18 increased to 8,283 and making a total of patients treated  up to 22,836 and 70 percent were for bodaboda accidents.

He said that because a motorcycle is an open tool, it is easy to pass the leg, waist, chest and other parts of the body and that it is badly affected by the head of the helmet.

“Almost 40 percent of patients coming here (MOI) reports indicate they were not wearing a helmet, another fastened or not at all, sometimes worn by not correctly, there are those who cut themselves from hair hairstyles,” said Dr Nchimbi.

Despite this increase, the MOI is still heavily burdened by the high cost of serving the accident patients as many of them have no brothers.

MOI Relations Officer, Patrick Mvungi said the treatment of these patients takes a long time, “there are some who have come to the city to seek life, their relatives are not there so when they are accidentally injured and they are being treated by the institutions from their treatment, clothing and food.

"We announce them in the media and when they happen to be unfortunate they die, if their relatives are not found we will do the same procedures with the body where the body has to stay for some time and those who will contact the municipality that will be lost."


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